Posted in Reviews

Watching The Bodies by Graham Smith

Watching The Bodies: a Jake Boulder ThrillerWatching The Bodies: a Jake Boulder Thriller by Graham Smith

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Fans of classic detective stories will love this twisted serial killer saga that pits a madman against an amateur sleuth who gets in over his head when asked to look into a local girl’s murder.

The novel has a distinct Agatha Christie feel and delivers on the classic suspense, just like the legendary author.

The town of Casperton is rocked when a girl is found murdered, quite brutally. Her rich parents enlist the help of the local PI, Alphonse, who pulls his friend, Jake Boulder into the investigation. While this looks like a “straightforward” killing as details of the victim’s life emerge, soon more bodies are found and it becomes apparent that the town is in the grip of a madman, who will do anything for one more kill.

I liked Jake as a character, he was quirky and flawed, but very sharp and good-natured. He makes a great “hero” for the story and I’m interested to see more of him and where he goes throughout the series. The other characters were great too – Jake’s mother, Alphonse and Kira (the victim) were all really interesting.

The mystery was solid – not too twisty as has been the recent trend, but really a battle of wits between the detectives and the killer, to see who wins. And it’s quite a ride. The “action” isn’t what’s important, it’s the game of wits between the parties.

There were a couple of interesting subplots that I wish had gotten more time (like, Kira’s, um, fixation on Jake or the killer’s past) but i think that’s fairly typical for series debuts, as authors try out and see what works for the blend of characters.

Overall, I’m excited to see where this series goes in the future.

View all my reviews

Posted in Reviews

The Policewoman by Justin W.M. Roberts

SThe PolicewomanThe Policewoman by Justin W.M. Roberts

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

3.5, rounded up to 4 stars.

Readers looking for a nonstop thrill ride through the underworld of narcoterrorism need look no further than “The Policewoman.” The book is not only an action-packed ride, but based on current events involving drug cartels and powerful drug kingpins, feels relevant; like it could indeed be the future.

This book is set in 2026, when the world’s most elite police units help take down brutal drug lords, who run the supply and distribution of the world’s drug supply. Sarah, the main character, is enlisted to help elite United Kingdom and Irish forces take down an Irish drug cartel, which has set up its largest factory in Sarah’s native Indonesia. Sarah, a bit of a “Wonder Woman” herself, must help bring down these criminals, who are as brutal and sadistic as they are efficient. Along the way, Sarah must fight for her own life, as well as the lives of those she loves.

This book has a great premise – it’s like a Mission Impossible movie in novel form. The suspense comes from whether or not the lead characters can survive their mission: the enemy is incredibly ruthless and cruel, employing a psychopathic killer to take vengeance on those who stand in their way. And the scenes with this killer do not hold back – he’s a pretty terrifying character.

The book also features some very good, developed characters – they quote movies and joke around, as well as fall in love. I wasn’t necessarily expecting to laugh or get the feels from what appears to be a tough-guy action novel. I was very pleasantly surprised.

The only drawback of the novel is that some of the descriptions and background information can get tedious, but with some polishing, the author could cut down the novel’s length and make the book a little tighter and take it from “good” to “great.”

But the story at its core is really enthralling and will delight military/action fans. I enjoyed the great locations and characters very much.

I’m excited to see what is next for this author.

View all my reviews

Posted in Uncategorized

What I bought this week

Even though I keep pretty busy with my review books, I still always check Amazon for great deals on good books – which means that my TBR pile is ever-growing.

Here’s my haul for this week! Let me know if you have read any and share your thoughts:

the-silent-twin-caroline-mitchell

Nine-year-old twins Abigail and Olivia vow never to be parted. But when Abigail goes missing from Blackwater Farm, DC Jennifer Knight must find her before it’s too late. 

Twin sister Olivia has been mute since Abigail’s disappearance. But when she whispers in Jennifer’s ear, Jennifer realises it is Abigail’s voice pleading to be found. 

A damp and decaying house set in acres of desolate scrubland, the farm is a place of secrets, old and new – and Jennifer must unravel them all in order to find the lost girl. But could Olivia’s bond with her twin hold the key to finding Abigail? And can Jennifer break through her silence in time to save her sister’s life?


9780618982660

An epic tale of one man’s courage in the face of genocide and his granddaughter’s quest to tell his story

In the heart of the Ottoman Empire as World War I rages, Stepan Miskjian’s world becomes undone. He is separated from his family as they are swept up in the government’s mass deportation of Armenians into internment camps. Gradually realizing the unthinkable—that they are all being driven to their deaths—he fights, through starvation and thirst, not to lose hope. Just before killing squads slaughter his caravan during a forced desert march, Stepan manages to escape, making a perilous six-day trek to the Euphrates River carrying nothing more than two cups of water and one gold coin. In his desperate bid for survival, Stepan dons disguises, outmaneuvers gendarmes, and, when he least expects it, encounters the miraculous kindness of strangers.

The Hundred-Year Walk alternates between Stepan’s saga and another journey that takes place a century later, after his family discovers his long-lost journals. Reading this rare firsthand account, his granddaughter Dawn MacKeen finds herself first drawn into the colorful bazaars before the war and then into the horrors Stepan later endured. Inspired to retrace his steps, she sets out alone to Turkey and Syria, shadowing her resourceful, resilient grandfather across a landscape still rife with tension. With his journals guiding her, she grows ever closer to the man she barely knew as a child. Their shared story is a testament to family, to home, and to the power of the human spirit to transcend the barriers of religion, ethnicity, and even time itself. 


9781517770259_p0_v1_s192x300

When historian Carrie Jo Jardine accepted her dream job as the chief historian at Seven Sisters in Mobile, Alabama, she had no idea what she would encounter. The moldering old plantation housed more than a few boxes of antebellum artifacts and forgotten oil paintings. Secrets lived there””and they demanded to be set free.

When young, wealthy Ashland Stuart offered Carrie Jo the job, he had no idea that she had a secret of her own. Carrie Jo dreams about the past. An unexpected accident takes Carrie Jo back in time as a witness to life at the plantation over 150 years ago. An impassioned plea from Ashland puts Carrie Jo in a precarious position as the two work together to find a missing heiress, the young and beautiful Calpurnia Cottonwood.

A collection of journals and a series of dreams give Carrie Jo all the clues she needs to find the missing girl, but both a present-day danger and one from the past try to stop her. Will Carrie Jo solve the mystery of the house or will she pay the ultimate price?