Posted in Reviews

#BlogTour: The Man in the Wall by Emma Ångström

About the Book:

Alva is a sad and lonely child. With her father locked up in prison, she moves with her mother and two older sisters to an apartment building in town. She does not like her new home. Her room is small and her sisters continue to exclude Alva from their games.

Soon a bizarre murder takes place in the building. A husband discovers his wife dead in the hall of their apartment, two week after she disappeared from their home.

Where had the body been hidden for two weeks? And how could the perpetrator get in and out of the apartment?

As more disturbing things start to take place, Alva is drawn into a sick and twisted game by a killer who is hiding in plain sight. But Alva is just a child and has no idea just how deadly her new friend might be…

The Man in the Wall is a thrilling and stylish Scandinavian thriller.

My Review:

If you are a fan of horror movies, you will love this book.

It’s not a slasher/gory/bloody book (too much, at least) but it is a kind of creepy that will completely unsettle you. It’s definitely a “What if?” type of book, and that scenario is really horrifying. It’s perfect for these gray, cold nights when you’re lookin for a scary read to put a little extra chill into your night.

And the mIn character, Alva, is really something. She’s a complete mystery at first, then when you get to understand her, it’s very, um, interesting. (I’m realllly trying not to give spoilers!)

The ending is so creepy. OMG. Just wait for it. It really brings things full circle and will leave you quite breathless. I was creeped out long after closing the book.

Overall, this is a great, gritty, scary read. I really liked it.

About the Author:

Emma Ångström is an author and architect. She has a Master’s degree in architecture from the Royal Technical University in Stockholm and from Parsons in New York. Besides her writing she currently works as head of communications at an architectural firm in Stockholm, Sweden.

She was born in 1982 in Västerås, Sweden, and started her writing career as a journalist at the age of 17. Since then, she has also worked as a lighting designer, and written non-fiction books about lighting design and architecture.

Ångström made her debut in 2009 with the novel AND ALL IS DISTORTED (Och allt är förvridet). In 2016 THE MAN IN THE WALL was released, a remarkable and nerve-wracking thriller with a ”monster” it is hard not to feel certain sympathy with. Condensed writing shaping characters of real flesh and blood, a steady hand’s brushwork forming each piece of the portrait’s originality to a whole, stylistically assured.

Links:

Author website: www.emmaangstrom.se

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_emmaangstrom_/

Advertisements
Posted in Book Extras

Teaser Tuesday – on a Thursday!: Man in the Wall by Emma Ångström


Welcome to Teaser Tuesday, the weekly Meme that wants you to add books to your TBR, or just share what you are currently reading. The meme is hosted by The Purple Booker!
It is very easy to play along:
Grab your current read

  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  •  Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers! Everyone loves Teaser Tuesday.

This week has been crazy, so I was unable to post my Teaser Tuesday this Tuesday. So we’re still celebrating TT – but on Thursday! Gasp!

Anyway, I am loving this book so far – and I’ll be on the book tour soon! Yay! It’s really very eerie and unpredictable – I’m excited to see where it goes from here!

Here we go:

Alva lay in bed and waited. There was a drumming in her body. She was still on edge but knew she couldn’t let herself be scared. Not now. She was never scared of anything. Even so, the fear she felt seeing Vanja in the dream did not subside.

About the Book

Alva is a sad and lonely child. With her father locked up in prison, she moves with her mother and two older sisters to an apartment building in town. She does not like her new home. Her room is small and her sisters continue to exclude Alva from their games.

Soon a bizarre murder takes place in the building. A husband discovers his wife dead in the hall of their apartment, two weeks after she disappeared from their home.

Where had the body been hidden for two weeks? And how could the perpetrator get in and out of the apartment?

As more disturbing things start to take place, Alva is drawn into a sick and twisted game by a killer who is hiding in plain sight. But Alva is just a child and has no idea just how deadly her new friend might be…

The Man in the Wall is a thrilling and stylish Scandinavian thriller.

Posted in Lists

Thursday Musings: The DNF Graveyard

 

I’ve had a really great streak going lately – the last several books I have read have all been great. I’ve really been on quite a roll.

Which got me thinking about books that I didn’t mesh with – specifically ones that I wasn’t able to finish. Don’t get me wrong, that doesn’t make them “bad,” they just weren’t for me. Usually, if I only get a couple chapters into a book and realize it’s not for me, I don’t post a review. I don’t feel I can truly review a book having only read maybe two or three chapters.

So for the first time, I’m admitting which books I couldn’t finish – at least the first time I picked them up (See more on that below).

  1. A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1) by George R.R. Martin: After hearing all the hype about the TV series, I was really curious about the books, because that’s how I think. But I couldn’t get more than 100 pages in. Even though I knew it was a fantasy/epic/drama, it was just SO MUCH of all of that. I couldn’t stomach it, I guess for the same reasons I don’t like soap operas. Oh well.
  2. The Witches: Salem, 1692 by Stacy Schiff: I have always been fascinated by the Salem witch trials, and have even visited Salem, Mass. But I couldn’t get into this book, which blended reality and legend and lots and lots of small details. I couldn’t follow it at all.
  3. One Fifth Avenue by Candace Bushnell: I got about halfway through this book before letting it just drift off and finally putting it away. I just couldn’t really sympathize with others the characters here. But maybe that’s because they were just so different from me. Or the fact that I never liked “Sex and the City.” *shrugs*
  4. The Girl with the Dragin Tattoo by Stieg Larsson: Ok, so the first time I picked this book up in an airport bookstore, I let the Swedish names trip me up. I couldn’t focus on the Tory because I was distract d by the hard to pronounce names and places. But then, maybe 2 years or so later, I decided to give it another try. And I DEVOURED the entire series. I absolutely loved it. Which goes to show you: never give up on a book totally. You may change your mind.

What books have you never been able to finish? Or do you think I should give one of these another chance? Let me know!

Posted in Reviews

The Lost Woman by Sara Blaedel

The Lost WomanThe Lost Woman by Sara Blaedel

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I didn’t know if I’d like this novel from the description. It seemed interesting, by more focused on characters than plot.

But I am so glad to say that I was wrong. This novel was incredibly intriguing and I loved every page.

The story begins with the murder of a woman in England, Who turns out to be a Danish woman reported missing nearly 20 years earlier. Louise Rick is plunged into the case when it turns out the dead woman is her new boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend. As they dig into her pass it becomes apparent that her murder may not be random, The culmination of nearly 20 years of events.

Don’t want to give away too much because the reveal is very good but this novel is so much deeper than just a police procedural. The background is explained along side of the modern case story; we learn about Sophie’s background and what led to her actions, and therefore the actions of her killer, as police investigate her murder.

It’s really good because it involves a modern-day issue that is complex and nuanced and the story is too. Even the ending is incredibly complex and makes you think. It’s not a black-and-white story and that makes the novel even better.

Some of the danish names were hard to keep straight but the main characters have fairly simple, Anglicized names, which made it a tad easier.

This is a novel in a series but I read it as a standalone. It certainly can’t be read as a standalone and I had no problems picking up the storylines. The only thing I didn’t like about this book being part of a series is the fact that I feel bad that I missed such great novels – I’ll be going back and looking up the rest of the Louise Rick series.

View all my reviews

Posted in Reviews

Stone Coffin by Knell Eriksson

Stone CoffinStone Coffin by Kjell Eriksson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This book has great potential, but doesn’t to the exciting action promised in the description. It’s more a crawl through an intriguing-enough mystery, rather than an action-packed escapade.

The book follows Ann Lindell, who is investigating the murder of a woman and her young daughter soon be husband is tracked down, and his fate leaves more questions than answers. Why would a successful young man on the brink of taking in some big money run down his family? Or if he didn’t do it, who did?

Sounds good right? This book had so much potential but gets bogged down in the personal trials of the investigative team and action that unfolds fairly slowly. The action never really gets going and the mystery just ends up….solved. They figure it out and move on, I guess.

I wasn’t too worried about who the culprit was by the end of the novel – but I was interested to see how it all fit together. More because I did like the idea of the novel, and wanted to see it through. But I wasn’t turning pages frenetically or anything.

And there is an interesting twist, don’t get me wrong. But the pace of the novel is so slow. It really takes away from the excitement that you get from most thrillers and police procedurals.

Plus, because it’s a series, the personal issues presented in the novel don’t get solved. They’re left for the next installment – boo!

So, I don’t know what to say about this one. It has the potential, but it’s not there yet. Not my cup of tea.

View all my reviews